Technology Solutions

 
 Our Rising Dependency on Cyberphysical

In a previous column, I discussed how “cyberphysical” is an appropriate term to capture this new world we are entering, where machines operate automatically and rapidly based on real-time feedback. The next step is to understand why this cyberphysical matters to the wider population that these machines will service. We can then assess levels of risk in order to better develop a culture of cyberphysical security.

The most notable trend is that critical services we rely on are increasingly dependent upon cyberphysical interactivity. The scope of these critical services continues to broaden and deepen across industries, especially as the functionality and speed of devices is more widely understood.

To me, nothing offers a more direct example of cyberphysical dependency than heart pacemakers. More than three million people rely on these devices every day, and 600,000 new implants are performed each year (American Heart Association). These cyberphysical devices not only manage electrical impulses in the human body, but they can also connect to external, remote systems for diagnosis and adjustments. Security takes on new meaning when you consider how and where these cyberphysical systems reside.

Another set of cyberphysical interactions occur to deliver our electricity, which we ambitiously consume at approximately 18,000 TerraWatts a year. How many of us can go 60 minutes without an electrical charge to our cell phones? Smart meters, not to mention power generation control systems, play a part in delivering this critical energy service.

Moving forward, we can envision a host of additional cyberphysical systems beyond these two examples, managing and impacting our daily lives. Many have seen self-driving cars, which are expected to grow at 134% CAGR in the next five years (not to mention electric cars, another dependency back on our power generation systems). Or consider home automation systems and maritime cargo monitoring.

As a security specialist, while I anticipate great reward from these new types of cyberphysical systems, I also envision the need for better protection. The dependency on cyberphysical systems exposes the broader population to a variety of risks.

While I will outline here some of these risks, be assured that my follow-on column will discuss solutions. My intent is to help readers visualize the relevance of cyberphysical systems in day-to-day lives, as background to why new approaches to security are required. And while our researchers handle very targeted and device-specific vulnerabilities behind closed doors, I will discuss in public only broad strokes of exposure, rather than risk proliferating any attack specifics.

As an initial example, many readers may be familiar with home automation systems that now include thermostats with remote control capabilities. Researchers have already performed “jail break” attacks to take over such temperature-altering devices, building upon prior attack lessons learned. Similar to information security holes in enterprise devices, these consumer thermostats lack robust security measures.

Amidst pressures to be “first to market,” it is not uncommon for manufacturers to trade off convenience and price for limited protection. In some cases, it might not even be a conscious design decision. Considering our growing dependency on cyberphysical systems, however, security testing seems an obvious addition (but I will discuss solutions further in my next column).

In other industries, it is less a rush to the consumer market triggering risks than it is a status quo regarding defining what constitutes “safe.” In the energy sector, offshore oil rigs were once “air gapped” and not connected to other systems.

Today, devices from as far afield as transportation and government services have typically been prioritized by physical security implications first. Will seat belts cause more injuries or save more lives, for example, or how will devices from state clinics affect the medical condition of citizens? Today, as cyber merges with physical inside vehicles and operating rooms, “safe” needs a new perspective. Has the system been tested against remote control access? If a cyberphysical device receives false commands, what are the implications?

These are just two examples of different dimensions of risk we are exposed to as we enter the cyberphysical era. The high level of machine-to-machine interactivity, the speed of sharing real-time information automatically, and the trade off of convenience for security in product lifecycle management will all contribute to new levels of risk as cyberphysical systems emerge.

Considering our increasing dependence on these critical systems, the onus is on our industry to devise new and better security models. In my next column, I will illuminate options for how we can move forward, including implementing security measures much earlier in the design lifecycle.

 

From: www.securityweek.com

By Nate Kube


Feelpcs's News 
  • El ransomware SamSam ataca a entidades financieras peruanas  

    Desde Hispasec tenemos conocimiento de los ataques sufridos por entidades financieras peruanas, ataques que han tenido como objetivo principal la instalación del ransomware SamSam (también conocido como Samsa o Samas).

  • Destapada operación de blanqueo a través de juegos para móvil gracias a un MongoDB sin control de acceso  

    La organización utilizaba tarjetas de crédito robadas para comprar mejoras e ítems en los juegos para móvil de forma automatizada, que después revendían a cambio de dinero real en portales de compra-venta de recursos alternativos.

  • Cinco maneras de saber si tu empresa es vulnerable a ataques informáticos  

    Ninguna empresa está libre de ser víctima de un ataque informático y por ello la ciberseguridad ya no puede ser opcional en los negocios. Un ataque puede secuestrar información, detener durante días las actividades de una empresa, o alzarse con data confidencial de clientes, entre muchos otros perjuicios..

  • Más de 1'000,00 routers y dispositivos NAS afectados por VPNFilter  

    El equipo de investigadores de Cisco Talos se hacen eco de una nueva familia de malware muy destructiva: VPNFilter. Capaz de robar credenciales, exfiltrar información e incluso destruir el dispositivo afectado.

  • Un grupo de hackers crean una "llave maestra" que abre millones de habitaciones de hotel  

    A partir de hoy, piénselo dos veces antes de dejar pertenencias valiosas en su habitación de hotel. Esta puede ser desbloqueada por un extraño.

  • Who to trust: Different types of SSL certificates  

    A secure connection is encrypted and therefore safe; an unprotected one isn’t. Easy, right? But where do certificates come from, and what’s the difference between SSL and TLS? What does a digital certificate have to do with security, anyway?

  • Guía básica para entender de una vez qué es eso del ‘blockchain’  

    Cadena de bloques. ¿Harto de escuchar que el 'blockchain' va a suponer una revolución? Te explicamos por qué puede ser clave en el futuro

  • Seguridad: Cómo evitar que te pirateen el móvil  

    Guía básica contra virus y otras amenazas móviles. Para que no te timen. O para solucionarlo si ya has picado.

  • Alteryx data leak exposes 123 million households: What you need to know 

    More than 120 million U.S. households had information exposed in a data leak, potentially raising the risk of identity theft for the impacted American families.

  • Nueva campaña de vales regalo que recolecta tu tarjeta de crédito 

    Spam publicitando una nueva campaña fraudulenta, que está afectando a gran cantidad de firmas; utilizándolas como señuelo para recolectar los datos privados de los visitantes, e incluso, para estafarlos recabando sus datos bancarios

  • Mirai IoT Botnet: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know 

    1. IoT Botnet ‘Mirai’ Targets Vulnerable ‘Smart’ IoT Technology and Turns Them into ‘Bots’
    2. ‘Mirai’ Took Out Amazon, Spotify, Twitter and More Websites in a DDOS Attack
    3. ‘Mirai’s Author Has an Avi of Anime Character Anna Nishikinomiya and Mirai Means “Future” in Japanese
    4. You Can Wipe Off the Malware From an IoT System But Recurrence is Likely
    5. Source Code for ‘Mirai’ Botnet was Released Publicly Which Opens the Door for Future Botnet Attacks

  • 5 reglas de oro para usuarios de redes sociales 

    .-No alimentar a los trolls .-No se debe publicar o volver a publicar nada ilegal .-No volver a publicar estafas .-Piense en las reacciones de los lectores .-No haga que sus datos privados sean publicos.

  • El "Cómo se hizo" del reportaje de "Soy Noticia" 

    Nacho Medina comprueba cómo pueden acceder a sus datos sin que se dé cuenta

  • Our Rising Dependency on Cyberphysical  

    Critical services we rely on are increasingly dependent upon cyberphysical interactivity. The scope of these critical services continues to broaden and deepen across industries, especially as the functionality and speed of devices is more widely understood.

  • What is spyware? 

    Because of its popularity, the internet has become an ideal target for advertising. As a result, spyware, or adware, has become increasingly prevalent. When troubleshooting problems with your computer, you may discover that the source of the problem is spyware software that has been installed on your machine without your knowledge.

  • Understanding Hidden Threats: Rootkits and Botnets 

    Attackers are continually finding new ways to access computer systems. The use of hidden methods such as rootkits and botnets has increased, and you may be a victim without even realizing it.

  • Phishing: Still a concern 

    Businesses often don’t realize how vulnerable their confidential data is until it’s exposed by a hack. By now, many are aware of external threats to data security and (hopefully) prepare accordingly, but breaches can still occur—despite taking the necessary security precautions. And with phishing, threats don’t need to sneak in the back door; sometimes they walk right through the front.

  • "Backoff" malware variants: Unskal, Saluchtra, Dexter and IeEnablerCby 

    Unskal
    Saluchtra
    Dexter
    IeEnablerCby

  • Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks 

    What is a social engineering attack?
    What is a phishing attack?
    How do you avoid being a victim?
    What do you do if you think you are a victim?

  • The Dos and Don'ts of Online Safety 

    20 ways to keep your internet identity safe from hackers

  • Si no actualizas Java, estás infectado 

    Los applets de Java, unidos a una máquina virtual JRE vulnerable, son hoy por hoy la combinación perfecta para que los atacantes infecten a sus víctimas. No importa qué hábitos se sigan en el sistema: no tener actualizado JRE, es garantía de infección. Veamos por qué y cómo protegerse.

  • Descubren al espía "más complejo" del mundo 

    ¿Quién necesita a James Bond teniendo a Flame? Un malware que según expertos rusos lleva más de dos años robando todo tipo de información sensible bajo las órdenes de un gobierno no identificado.

  • Nuevos troyanos Spyeye orientados exclusivamente a entidades de Panamá y Honduras 

    Existen decenas de miles de versiones de Spyeye que atacan a cientos de entidades bancarias. Pero en nuestro laboratorio no habíamos visto aún una muestra orientada exclusivamente a bancos de Latinoamérica. Hasta ahora, estas entidades han sido atacadas por troyanos mucho más simples, pero parece que ya han entrado en el peligroso circuito de los troyanos más sofisticados.

  • Usted está en venta 

    Hasta hace poco, el software era un producto conocido, que se vendía en las tiendas en cajas envueltas en plástico transparente y, para comprarlo, sólo tenía que dar su número de tarjeta de crédito o unos cuantos billetes.

  • Microsoft publicará 16 boletines de seguridad el próximo martes 

    Siguiendo con su ciclo habitual de publicación de parches de seguridad los segundos martes de cada mes, Microsoft publicará el próximo 14 de junio 16 boletines de seguridad, correspondientes a los boletines MS11-037 y MS11-052, con un número indeterminado de vulnerabilidades cada uno, pero que completarán 34 vulnerabilidades.

  • Que es Virus Informatico, Malware, Trojan Horse ? 

    Un tipico caso de virus informatico:

  • Cómo elegir un router, el dispositivo clave para armar una red Wi-Fi en casa 

    Una red inalámbrica hogareña permite acceder a Internet a través de notebooks, netbooks, tabletas o celulares desde cualquier ambiente de la casa. Y esto es posible gracias a los routers, equipos que se conectan al módem y son el corazón de las redes sin cables (Wi-Fi). Aquí, algunos datos y sugerencias que quieren ser útiles a la hora de elegir un router para el hogar.

  • RSA: Ataque de Virus - Ejemplo "Para Prevenir Incidentes" 

    El pasado 18 de marzo RSA confesó que había sufrido un ataque dirigido en el que le robaron información relativa a su famoso producto SecurID. En estos momentos ya se sabe cómo accedieron a la información los atacantes y, de paso, que RSA tardó varios días en hacer público el incidente.

  • Vídeo: Kit de creación de phishing "especial" 

    Nuevas formar de alterar paginas webs para recabar email e informacion de usuarios en Internet. Tener mucho cuidado antes de ingresar datos en Internet, muchas paginas de bancos son clonadas.

  • El código de una tarjeta de crédito se puede comprar por dos dólares 

    Los ciberdelincuentes venden las claves a terceros para evitar riesgos - Los especialistas detectan una media de 63.000 nuevas amenazas al día.

  • Virus y Actualizaciones de windows y software afines 

    Resumen del Año 2010 - Virus y Actualizaciones de windows y software afines

  • 10 estrategias principales de seguridad 

    ¿Es un admirador del código malicioso, el spam o el phishing? ¿Lee o sigue listas extensas y complejas de pasos y precauciones? Si su respuesta es no para alguna de estas preguntas o para ambas, revise estas diez estrategias básicas que le permitirán mantener las cosas nocivas lejos de la computadora de su hogar y oficina.

  • Cuidado con los falsos antivirus 

    Dentro del rogueware ha habido siempre varias tendencias. La más conocida sea quizás la de los falsos antivirus, pero existen otras. En estos momentos hemos detectado una nueva campaña muy elaborada de rogueware que simula ser una herramienta de sistema.

  • Peligro de phishing en iPhone 

    Nitesh Dhanjani, investigador de seguridad ha publicado en su blog una vulnerabilidad por la cual un atacante podría engañar al usuario haciéndole creer que están en páginas de confianza como bancos, tiendas online u otras páginas de carácter sensible, cuando en realidad no lo están..

  • Manual para protegerse de los últimos engaños en Internet 

    Los hackers ya se mueven en las redes sociales. En Facebook y Twitter abundan los perfiles falsos y las páginas con programas engañosos. Buscan robar las claves de acceso de los usuarios a los servicios. Consejos para evitar caer en las trampas.

How can we help
  • Virus Removal Experts
  • All Desktop & Notebook Repairs
  • Screens, Motherboards, Hard drives
  • Soldering Jobs
  • Networking
  • Custom Builds
  • Website Design
What We Do